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Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 310 Ultra Compact Helium Leak Detector With 1.7 m≥/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing Pump, BSAA0000MM9A
Out of Stock
Expecting: 1
Arrival: 1 on 2022-01-28


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 310 Small footprint Helium Leak Detector, Portable Model, With 1.7 m≥/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing PumpPfeiffer Adixen Part Number BSAA0000MM9A These Pfeiffer ASM 310 helium leak detectors have a built-in internal dry diaphragm backing pump, pumping speed 1.7 m≥/h, are fully automatic, ultra compact, and light in weight, being small enough to place on the bench top. Its low weight and universal voltage enable the ASM 310 to be easily operated anywhere in the world. A transport case to safeguard against shipping damage and a trolley are available as accessories. They are a rugged multi-purpose model, easy and safe to handle, for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and hydrogen (H2). The ASM 310 is characterized by its powerful system, easy operation, ultra fast response and short recovery time. They are well suited for maintenance applications as well as small production environments. The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 5x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-7 mbar l/s. The ASM 310 can be adapted to specific applications with the aid of our extensive line of accessories for these multipurpose units. The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM-310 dry helium leak detector operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. These Pfeiffer ASM 310 dry helium leak detectors operate on 90-240 VAC, 50/60Hz and have Pfeiffer Vacuum part number BSAA0000MM9A.FEATURES of the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 310 Helium Leak Detector, Lightweight and portable, only 21 kg: Contains primary turbo pump and internal 1.25 CFM (1.7 m≥/h ) dry diaphragm backing roughing pump Minimum detectable leak rate 5 ∑ 10-12 Pa m3/s 1.1 l/s helium pumping speed Lightweight and portable, only 46 lbs (21 kg) Smart design with retractable handle Easy to move Detachable control panel On-demand operating interface Intuitive and customizable menu Small footprint, small size Can be operated in any position Large, bright color touchscreen Color graphics functionality Password-protected display Integrated SD memory card for recording, downloading data and parameter settings Voice synthesizer OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 310 Helium Leak Detector: Helium Spray Gun Standard, PN: 112535 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Torr l/s, legend in English, PN: 108881 Remote Control RC 500 WL for helium leak detector, wireless, PN: PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired. The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P1012206



Price: $25,935.00


Regular Price: $27,300.00



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector With 15 m3/h Internal Wet Oil-Sealed Rotary Vane Pump, JSVA00A0ML9A
Out of Stock
Expecting: 3
Arrival: 2 on 2021-11-29


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Table Top Model With Internal Wet Oil-Sealed Rotary Vane Backing Roughing PumpPfeiffer Adixen Part Number JSVA00A0ML9A These Pfeiffer ASM 340 helium leak detectors have a built-in internal wet oil-sealed rotary vane pump, pumping speed 15 m3/h, are fully automatic and compact, being small enough to place on the bench top. They are a rugged multi-purpose model, easy and safe to handle, for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and hydrogen (H2). The ASM 340 is characterized by its powerful system, easy operation, ultra fast response and short recovery time. They are well suited for maintenance applications as well as small production environments. The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 1x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-9 mbar l/s. The ASM 340 can be adapted to specific applications with the aid of our extensive line of accessories for these multipurpose units. The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM-340 dry helium leak detector operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. These Pfeiffer ASM 340 wet helium leak detectors operate on 100-130V, 50/60Hz, inludes a basic 15 pins I/O interface board, and have Pfeiffer Vacuum part number JSVA00A0ML9A. FEATURES of the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Portable Table Top Model: Contains a turbo primary pump and an internal 11 CFM (15 m3/hr) wet oil-sealed rotary vane backing roughing pump 2.5 l/s helium pumping speed Fast time to test: unrivalled performances from small to large volumes Narrow design and higly maneuverable Customizable and detachable color operator interface display touchscreen Integrated SD card for data processing Basic 15 pins I/O interface board OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector: Helium Spray Gun Standard, PN: 112535 Helium Spray Gun Elite Kit with accessories in compact case, PN: 109951 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in mbar l/s, legend in English, PN: 106688 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Pa M3/s, legend in English, PN: 108880 Remote Control RC 500 WL for helium leak detector, wireless, PN: PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105942



Price: $24,035.00


Regular Price: $25,300.00



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector With 15 m3/h Internal Wet Oil-Sealed Rotary Vane Pump, JSVA00A2ML9A
Out of Stock
Expecting: 1
Arrival: 1 on 2022-04-08


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Table Top Model With 15 m3/h Internal Wet Oil-Sealed Rotary Vane Backing Roughing PumpPfeiffer Adixen Part Number JSVA00A2ML9A These Pfeiffer ASM 340 helium leak detectors have a built-in internal wet oil-sealed rotary vane pump, pumping speed 15 m3/h, are fully automatic and compact, being small enough to place on the bench top. They are a rugged multi-purpose model, easy and safe to handle, for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and Hydrogen (H2). The ASM 340 is characterized by its powerful system, easy operation, ultra fast response and short recovery time. They are well suited for maintenance applications as well as small production environments. The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 1x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-9 mbar l/s. The ASM 340 can be adapted to specific applications with the aid of our extensive line of accessories for these multipurpose units. The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM-340 dry operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. These Pfeiffer ASM 340 wet helium leak detectors operate on 100-130V, 50/60Hz, inlude a 37 pins I/O interface board, and have Pfeiffer Vacuum part number JSVA00A2ML9A. FEATURES of the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Table Top Model: Contains a turbo primary pump and an internal 11 CFM (15 m3/hr) rotary vane backing roughing pump 2.5 l/s helium pumping speed Fast time to test: unrivalled performances from small to large volumes Narrow design and higly maneuverable Customizable and detachable color operator interface display touchscreen Integrated SD card for data processing Interface board: 37 pins I/O OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector: Helium Spray Gun Standard, PN: 112535 Helium Spray Gun Elite Kit with accessories in compact case, PN: 109951 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in mbar l/s, legend in English, PN: 106688 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Pa M3/s, legend in English, PN: 108880 Remote Control RC 500 WL for helium leak detector, wireless, PN: PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P1012204



Price: $24,320.00


Regular Price: $25,600.00



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 D Helium Leak Detector With 3.4 m3/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing Pump, KSBA00A2MM9A
Out of Stock
Expecting: 2
Arrival: 1 on 2022-04-01


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 D Helium Leak Detector, Portable Table Top Model, With 3.4 m3/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing PumpPfeiffer Adixen Part Number KSBA00A2MM9A These Pfeiffer ASM 340 D helium leak detectors have a built-in internal dry diaphragm backing pump, pumping speed 3.4 m3/h, are fully automatic and compact, being small enough to place on the bench top. They are a rugged multi-purpose model, easy and safe to handle, for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and hydrogen (H2). The ASM 340 is characterized by its powerful system, easy operation, ultra fast response and short recovery time. They are well suited for maintenance applications as well as small production environments. The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 1x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-9 mbar l/s. The ASM 340 can be adapted to specific applications with the aid of our extensive line of accessories for these multipurpose units. The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM-340 dry helium leak detector operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. These Pfeiffer ASM 340 wet helium leak detectors operate on 90-240 VAC, 50/60Hz, include a 37 pins I/O interface board, and have Pfeiffer Vacuum part number KSBA00A2MM9A.FEATURES of the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Table Top Model: Contains primary turbo pump and internal 2.5 CFM (3.4 m3/h) diaphragm backing roughing pump Automatic calibration Fast time to test: unrivalled performances from small to large volumes Narrow design and higly maneuverable Customizable and detachable color operator interface display touchscreen Integrated SD card for data processing 37 pins I/O interface board OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector: Helium Spray Gun Standard, PN: 112535 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Torr l/s, legend in English, PN: 108881 Remote Control RC 500 WL for helium leak detector, wireless, PN: PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P1012205



Price: $25,650.00


Regular Price: $27,000.00



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 D Helium Leak Detector With 3.4 m3/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing Pump, KSBA00A0MM9A
Out of Stock
Expecting: 6
Arrival: 1 on 2021-12-24


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 D Helium Leak Detector, Portable Table Top Model, With 3.4 m3/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing PumpPfeiffer Adixen Part Number KSBA00A0MM9A These Pfeiffer ASM 340 D helium leak detectors have a built-in internal dry diaphragm backing pump, pumping speed 3.4 m3/h, are fully automatic and compact, being small enough to place on the bench top. They are a rugged multi-purpose model, easy and safe to handle, for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and hydrogen (H2). The ASM 340 is characterized by its powerful system, easy operation, ultra fast response and short recovery time. They are well suited for maintenance applications as well as small production environments. The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 1x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-9 mbar l/s. The ASM 340 can be adapted to specific applications with the aid of our extensive line of accessories for these multipurpose units. The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM-340 dry helium leak detector operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. These Pfeiffer ASM 340 wet helium leak detectors operate on 90-240 VAC, 50/60Hz, include a basic 15 pins I/O interface board, and have Pfeiffer Vacuum part number KSBA00A0MM9A.FEATURES of the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Table Top Model: Contains primary turbo pump and internal 2.5 CFM (3.4 m3/h) dry diaphragm backing roughing pump Automatic calibration Fast time to test: unrivalled performances from small to large volumes Narrow design and higly maneuverable Customizable and detachable color operator interface display touchscreen Integrated SD card for data processing Basic 15 pins I/O interface board OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector: Helium Spray Gun Standard, PN: 112535 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Torr l/s, legend in English, PN: 108881 Remote Control RC 500 WL for helium leak detector, wireless, PN: PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105940



Price: $25,270.00


Regular Price: $26,600.00



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector With 15 m3/h Internal Wet Oil-Sealed Rotary Vane Pump & Mobile Cart, JSVA00A0ML9A
Out of Stock
Arrival: 2 on 2022-01-05


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector With 15 m3/h Internal Wet Oil-Sealed Rotary Vane Pump & Mobile Cart KitIncludes ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Leak Detector (PN: JSVA00A0ML9A) and Modile Cart (PN: 122570). These Pfeiffer ASM 340 helium leak detectors have a built-in internal wet oil-sealed rotary vane pump, pumping speed 15 m3/h, are fully automatic and compact, being small enough to place on the bench top. They are a rugged multi-purpose model, easy and safe to handle, for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and hydrogen (H2). The ASM 340 is characterized by its powerful system, easy operation, ultra fast response and short recovery time. They are well suited for maintenance applications as well as small production environments. The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 1x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-9 mbar l/s. The ASM 340 can be adapted to specific applications with the aid of our extensive line of accessories for these multipurpose units. The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM-340 dry helium leak detector operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. These Pfeiffer ASM 340 wet helium leak detectors operate on 100-130V, 50/60Hz, inludes a basic 15 pins I/O interface board, and are a kit of the leak detector (Pfeiffer Vacuum part number JSVA00A0ML9A) and modile cart (Pfeiffer Vacuum part number 122570). FEATURES of the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Portable Table Top Model With Mobile Cart Kit: Contains a turbo primary pump and an internal 11 CFM (15 m3/hr) wet oil-sealed rotary vane backing roughing pump 2.5 l/s helium pumping speed Automatic calibration Fast time to test: unrivalled performances from small to large volumes Narrow design and higly maneuverable Customizable and detachable color operator interface display touchscreen Integrated SD card for data processing Basic 15 pins I/O interface board Shipped With Mobile Cart - Customer Assembly Required OPTIONAL ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector: Helium Spray Gun Standard, PN: 112535 Helium Spray Gun Elite Kit with accessories in compact case, PN: 109951 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Torr l/s, legend in English, PN: 108881 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Pa M3/s, legend in English, PN: 108880 Remote Control RC 500 WL for helium leak detector, wireless, PN: PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105947



Price: $25,826.40


Regular Price: $27,185.69



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 D Helium Leak Detector With 3.4 m3/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing Pump & Mobile Cart, KSBA00A0MM9A
Out of Stock
Arrival: 1 on 2021-12-24


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 D Helium Leak Detector, Portable Table Top Model, With 3.4 m3/h Internal Dry Diaphragm Backing Pump & Mobile Cart KitIncludes ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Leak Detector (PN: KSBA00A0MM9A) and Modile Cart (PN: 122570). These Pfeiffer ASM 340 D helium leak detectors have a built-in internal dry diaphragm backing pump, pumping speed 3.4 m3/h, are fully automatic and compact, being small enough to place on the bench top. They are a rugged multi-purpose model, easy and safe to handle, for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and hydrogen (H2). The ASM 340 is characterized by its powerful system, easy operation, ultra fast response and short recovery time. They are well suited for maintenance applications as well as small production environments. The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 1x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-9 mbar l/s. The ASM 340 can be adapted to specific applications with the aid of our extensive line of accessories for these multipurpose units. The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM-340 dry helium leak detector operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. These Pfeiffer ASM 340 wet helium leak detectors operate on 100-130V, 50/60Hz, inludes a basic 15 pins I/O interface board, and are a kit of the leak detector (Pfeiffer Vacuum part number KSBA00A0MM9A) and modile cart (Pfeiffer Vacuum part number 122570). FEATURES for the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Dry Helium Leak Detector & Mobile Cart Kit: Contains primary turbo pump and internal 2.5 CFM (3.4 m3/h) diaphragm backing roughing pump Automatic calibration Fast time to test: unrivalled performances from small to large volumes Narrow design and highly maneuverable Customizable operator interface with 360į viewing Integrated SD card for data processing Basic 15 pins I/O interface board Shipped With Mobile Cart - Customer Assembly Required Optional ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Dry Helium Leak Detector: Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Spray Gun, 112535 Helium Spray Gun Elite Kit with accessories in compact case, PN: 109951 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in mbar l/s, legend in English, PN: 106688 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Pa M3/s, legend in English, PN: 108880 Pfeiffer Adixen Std Helium Sniffer Probe, SNC1E1T1 Pfeiffer Adixen Wired Remote Control, in Torr l/s, 108881 Pfeiffer Adixen RC 500 WL Wireless Remote Control, PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detection-make sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105941



Price: $27,061.41


Regular Price: $28,485.69



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 390 High-Performance Mobile Helium Leak Detector With 35 m3/h Internal Dry ACP Backing Pump, PN: CSGB01G2MM9A
Out of Stock
Expecting: 1
Arrival: 1 on 2022-04-08


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 390 High-Performance Mobile Helium Leak Detector With 35 m3/h Internal Dry ACP Backing PumpPfeiffer Part Number CSGB01G2MM9A. The ASM 390 high-performance mobile helium leak detector is fitted with a powerful ACP 40 (35 m3/h ) dry rotary lobe backing pump. This makes it the ideal solution for maximum testing sensitivity in analytics, laboratories, and the solar panel & semiconductor industries. With the ASM 390, you will achieve extremely short pump down times even where large volumes are involved. The slim design and compact size set up on a cart with large wheels and a low center of gravity make this leak detector mobile and safe to handle. They can be used for both vacuum and sniffer leak detection with helium (4He, 3He) and hydrogen (H2). The minimum detectable leak rate available for this unit in vacuum mode is 1x10-12 mbar l/s and in sniffer mode 1x10-8 mbar l/s.The ASM 390 with its low noise level of only 55 dB(A) is unusually quiet for a leak detector of its class. The color display panel with full 360į viewing can be read from any position. This display is also detachable and can be positioned where the user can see it using four strong magnetic clips. An integrated SD memory card makes it easy to save test data and settings parameters. The ASM 390 has an integrated lockable toolbox for tools, spare parts and accessories. Thanks to its convenient bottle-holder, it is even possible to attach and carry a tracer helium gas bottle. Compatible with the wireless remote control RC 500 WL. This enables the leak detector to be operated even from a distance of up to 100 meters. The ASM 390 is the perfect solution for high sensitivity helium leak testing in very large systems and installations . The operating Instructions for the ASM 390 can be downloaded by scrolling down to PDF documents below. FEATURES of the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 390 Helium Leak Detector: Min. detectable leak 1x10-12 mbar 10 l/s helium pumping speed High Roughing Capacity, 28 CFM (35 m3/h ) Dry ACP Backing Pump Fast time to test: unrivaled performances from small to large volumes High maneuverability and compact design Superior leak testing performances Large rotateable color touch screen Dry and clean pumping technology Low maintenance requirements Ergonomic design with working surface Fast recovery in case of pollution Intuitive menu for easy operation Integrated toolbox for storage of accessories Fast start-up High sensitivity and accurate measurements Fully Semi S2 compliant Optional ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 390 Dry Helium Leak Detector Cart System: Bottle holder, PN: 118444 Helium Spray Gun, PN: 112535 Helium Sniffer Probe, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control (wired), leak rate in Torr l/s, legend in English, PN: 108881 Remote Control RC 500 WL (wireless), PN: PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detection-make sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105949



Price: $41,610.00


Regular Price: $43,800.00



Pfeiffer Adixen Transport Cart, 2 wheels, for ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector, Cart Only
In Stock: 5


Pfeiffer AdixenTransport Cart, 2 wheels, for ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector. (CART ONLY)Pfeiffer Adixen Part Number 122570 2 wheel plastic cart for ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector. Convenient drawer to store leak detector accessories (sniffer remote control...etc.) This is the CART ONLY. Specs on ASM 340 Helium Leak Detector Below. PDF Operating Instructions for Cart Below. FEATURES for the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Dry Helium Leak Detector Mobile: Contains primary turbo pump and internal 2.5 CFM diaphragm backing roughing pump Automatic calibration Fast time to test: unrivalled performances from small to large volumes Narrow design and highly maneuverable Customizable operator interface with 360į viewing Integrated SD card for data processing Optional ACCESSORIES for The Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 Dry Helium Leak Detector: Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Spray Gun, 112535 Helium Spray Gun Elite Kit with accessories in compact case, PN: 109951 Standard Sniffer Probe, 5 meters with 9 cm nozzle, PN: SNC1E1T1 Standard Remote control, leak rate in mbar l/s, legend in English, PN: 106688 Standard Remote control, leak rate in Pa M3/s, legend in English, PN: 108880 Pfeiffer Adixen Std Helium Sniffer Probe, SNC1E1T1 Pfeiffer Adixen Wired Remote Control, in Torr l/s, 108881 Pfeiffer Adixen RC 500 WL Wireless Remote Control, PT 445 432-T Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing. The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P108186



Price: $1,885.69



Ideal Vacuum PREMIUM Helium Spray Probe Kit w/Spray Gun, 1 Liter High Pressure Cylinder, and Quick Connectors.
In Stock: 1


Ideal Vacuum PREMIUM Helium Spray Kit, Used for Helium Leak Detectors. Includes a Spray Probe Gun, Small Aluminum High Pressure Cylinder, Precise Regulator, Adapter for Easy Refill, 10 ft. Hose with Quick connectors, and Sturdy Carrying Case. Ideal Vacuum PREMIUM Helium Spray Probe Kit is rugged and easy to use, the Helium Spray Probe is designed for use in maintenance or production leak detection applications. This PREMIUM helium spray probe kit includes a lightweight, aluminum, refillable high pressure cylinder with an adjustable precise output regulator. The helium flow rate can be adjusted between 0 and 0.1 Standard Liters Per Minute (SLPM). The reservoir cylinder is 3Ē diameter x 11Ē tall, with a volume of 1000 cc, and a burst pressure rating of 1800 psi. We recommend it be filled to no more than 1500 psig. DO NOT EXCEED RESERVOIR''S RATED PRESSURE. This small, convenient helium spray probe kit can be taken to any location without needing a large, heavy, helium tank. The kit includes a 10í cylinder-to-spray gun hose with C10 quick connectors. Also included are a straight stainless steel 4 probe tip, a 9 flexible probe tip, and a refilling adapter, all packaged in a sturdy, foam lined carrying case. For Proper Use - Download Helium Spray Probe Gun Users Guide.pdf on DOWNLOADS section.

Condition: New



Product Number: P1012177



Price: $855.00


Regular Price: $1,050.00



Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Spray Gun for ASM 182, 310, 340, 380 leak detectors, 112535
In Stock: 3
Expecting: 5
Arrival: 3 on 2021-12-17


Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Spray Gun for ASM 182, 310, ASM 340, ASM 380 Helium Leak DetectorsPfeiffer Adixen Part Number 112535 To be connected to a helium bottle or gas line for helium leak detection. Spraying helium in order to detect a leak is usually very easy, especially if you need fast and rough detection. Spraying helium could also become a technical challenge when you need to pinpoint very fine leaks. The Pfeiffer Adixen Helium Spray Gun is easy to use and a multipurpose tool which allows you to work in various test conditions. The controlled flow of helium from the spray gun allows you to keep a very low helium background, protect the detector against any helium pollution and avoid erroneous results by detecting very fine leaks. These Pfeiffer Standard Helium Spray Guns have part number 112535 and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Spray Gun: Helium Spray Gun 5 m Plastic Tube with M 1/4 G Connector 9 cm Nozzle Printed Manual Hard Plastic Case Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105944



Price: $619.66



Pfeiffer Helium Spray Gun Elite-Kit, Helium Leak Detector Spray Gun With Additional Accessories In A Compact Case, 109951
Out of Stock
Expecting: 4
Arrival: 4 on 2021-10-28


Pfeiffer Helium Spray Gun Elite-Kit, Helium Leak Detector Spray Gun With Additional Accessories In A Compact CasePfeiffer Vacuum Part Number 109951 To be connected to a helium bottle or gas line for helium leak detection. Spraying helium in order to detect a leak is usually very easy, especially if you need fast and rough detection. Spraying helium could also become a technical challenge when you need to pinpoint very fine leaks. The Pfeiffer Adixen Helium Spray Gun is easy to use and a multipurpose tool which allows you to work in various test conditions. The controlled flow of helium from the spray gun allows you to keep a very low helium background, protect the detector against any helium pollution and avoid erroneous results by detecting very fine leaks. These Pfeiffer Elite-Kit Standard Helium Spray Guns have part number 109951 and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Spray Gun: Helium Spray Gun 5 m Plastic Tube with M 1/4 G Connector 9 cm Nozzle Printed Manual Hard Plastic Case Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P1012210



Price: $1,052.31



Pfeiffer Adixen RC 10 Wireless Remote Control for ASM 310, 340, and 390 Leak Detector, 124193 PT 445 432-T
In Stock: 1


Pfeiffer Adixen RC 10 Wireless Remote Control for ASM 310, ASM 340, and ASM 390 Series Helium Leak DetectorsPfeiffer Adixen Part Number 124193, Replaces PT 445 432-TTouch screen display for single operation of the RC 10 remote control (wireless). Accommodated in a robust housing the shape of which enables ergonomic working. Magnets on the underside of the unit enable it to be attached to horizontal or vertical metal surfaces. The wireless version RC 10 enables remote operation up to a distance of over 100 m, depending on the reception conditions. The integrated rechargeable battery enables over 8 hours of operation, depending on the battery level. The leak rates can be displayed in digits or in a curve on the color display. Measured values of up to several hours of recording can be stored in an internal memory. The data storage interval is adjustable. The data can easily be downloaded to a USB stick via the integrated USB interface to save it. An internal trigger can be set to provide a warning if the limit leak rates are exceeded. An optical warning is shown on the display and an acoustic warning signal with variable pitch proportionally to the leak rate is sounded on the integrated loudspeaker or connected headphones. These Pfeiffer Adixen RC 10 (Pfeiffer Part Number 124193) replaces the older RC 500 WL Wireless Remote Control PT 445 432-T and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the RC 10: Wireless Remote Control Magnets to adhere to metal surfaces Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105948



Price: $2,843.59



Pfeiffer Adixen Wired Remote Control ASM 310, ASM 340, ASM 380 Helium Leak Detector, in Torr l/s, 108881
Out of Stock


Pfeiffer Adixen Wired Remote Control ASM 182, 310, ASM 340, and ASM 380 Helium Leak Detector, in Torr l/sPfeiffer Adixen Part Number 108881 These Pfeiffer Adixen standard wired remote control for ASM 182, 310, ASM 340 and ASM 380 leak detectors. Reads leak rate in Torr l/s. When the operator connects the remote control to the leak detector, the leak detector unit is automatically reprogrammed with the unit of the remote control. The unit is memorized by the detector when the operator disconnects the remote control. These Pfeiffer Standard standard wired remote control 108881 and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Standard Remote Control: Remote Control 5 meter cable Magnets to adhere to metallic surfaces Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105943



Price: $1,700.71


Regular Price: $1,790.22



Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 340 & ASM 380 Standard Wired Remote Control Replacement cable, 10 meter, 110881
Out of Stock
Expecting: 1
Arrival: 1 on 2022-01-21


Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 182, 310, 340 & ASM 380 Standard Wired Remote Control Replacement cable, 10 meterPfeiffer Adixen Part Number 110881These Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 182, 310, 340 & ASM 380 standard wired remote control replacement cables are 10 meters long. They are designed to work with all Pfeiffer Adixen ASM helium leak detectors, including the 182, 310, 340 and 380 helium leak detector models with the exception of the ASM 102 S and ASM 142 S. They are used to communicate between the leak detector and the wired remote control unit. These replacement cables have Pfeiffer Adixen part number 110881 and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Standard Remote Control: Remote Control 5 meter cable Magnets to adhere to metallic surfaces Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105945



Price: $180.67



Pfeiffer Adixen LP 505 Helium Sniffer Probe, 5M, for ASM 310/340/380 leak detectors. PN: BG 449 208-T
Out of Stock


Pfeiffer Adixen LP 505 Helium Sniffer Probe with Standard Tip, 5 meters long, for Pfeiffer Adixen leak detectors. Pfeiffer Adixen part number: BG 449 208-T These Pfeiffer Adixen sniffer probes are used with ASM helium leak detection in sniffing mode. Is a universal accessory which can be used with the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 310, ASM 340, ASM 380 leak detectors and to SmartTest with an extra interface HLT 550, HLT 560, HLT 570, HLT 565, HLT 572, HLT 575 leak detectors. Easy connections to the leak detectors by external coupling. These Pfeiffer Standard Helium sniffer probes have part number BG449208-T. The Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Helium Sniffer Probe: Sniffer probe with standard tip Cable length 5 m GO/NO-GO indication by LEDs Button for background suppression Sniffer tip rigid, 120 mm long Capillary filter Easy connection to the SmartTest with an extra interface Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe:Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P109703



Price: $2,126.25



Pfeiffer Adixen LP 510 Helium Sniffer Probe, 10M, for ASM 310/340/380 leak detectors. PN: BG 449 209-T
Out of Stock
Expecting: 4
Arrival: 2 on 2021-10-29


Pfeiffer Adixen LP 510 Helium Sniffer Probe with Standard Tip, 10 meters long, for Pfeiffer Adixen leak detectors. Pfeiffer Adixen part number:BG 449 209-T These Pfeiffer Adixen sniffer probes are used with ASM helium leak detection in sniffing mode. Is a universal accessory which can be used with the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 310, ASM 340, ASM 380 leak detectors and to the SmartTest with an extra interface. Easy connections to the leak detectors by external coupling. These Pfeiffer Adixen sniffer probes 10 meters long have part number BG449209-T and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Helium Sniffer Probe: Sniffer probe with standard tip Cable length 10 m GO/NO-GO indication by LEDs Button for background suppression Sniffer tip rigid, 120 mm long Capillary filter Easy connection to the SmartTest with an extra interface Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe:Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P108579



Price: $2,046.71



Pfeiffer LP503 Sniffer Probe 3 m, for Pfeiffer SmartTest HLT, ASM340, ASM380 Helium Leak Detectors. PN: BG 449 207-T
Out of Stock
Expecting: 1
Arrival: 1 on 2021-12-03


NEW Pfeiffer LP 503, 3 meter Sniffer Probe, for SmartTest, ASM 340 and ASM 380 Helium Leak Detectors HLT 550, HLT 560, HLT 570, HLT 565, HLT 572, HLT 575. Part Number: BG 449 207-T The LP 503, 3 meter Sniffer Probe is to be used in conjuction with the Pfeiffer leak detectors SmartTest HLT 550, HLT 560, HLT 565, HLT 570, HLT 572, and HLT 575. This is a Sniffer Probe with standard tip with GO/NO-Go indicator LED''s and has a button for background suppression. The Sniffer tip is rigid 120 mm long and comes with a capillary filter. It connects easy to the back of the SmartTest Leak Detectors. Enables both vacuum and sniffer leak detection wihtout requiring much alteration work. (This is the LP 503 Sniffer Probe, 3 meters long, ONLY, Remote Control, Pfeiffer HLT Series SmartTest Leak Detectors, Cart and other accessories sold separately.) For Instruction Manual, Download .PDF Below at (AVAILABLE DOWNLOADS:).

Condition: New



Product Number: P103918



Price: $1,854.90



Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Sniffer Probe, 10 m Tube, Flexible 15 cm Nozzle, for ASM models Leak Detectors. PN: SNC2E3T1
Out of Stock
Expecting: 3
Arrival: 1 on 2021-11-19


Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Sniffer Probe, 10 m Tube, Flexible 15 cm Nozzle, for ASM 182, 310, ASM 340, ASM 380 Helium Leak Detectors. Part Number SNC2E3T1 These Pfeiffer Adixen sniffer probes are used with ASM helium leak detection in sniffing mode. Is a universal accessory which can be used with the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 182, 310, ASM 340 or ASM 380 leak detector. Easy connections to the leak detectors by external coupling. These Pfeiffer Standard Helium sniffer probes have part number SNC2E1T1 and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Helium Sniffer Probe: Plastic Tube 10 m Rigid Nozzle Length 15 cm Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detection-make sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P108577



Price: $1,132.00



Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Sniffer Probe, 5 m Tube, Rigid 9 cm Nozzle, for ASM 310, ASM 340, ASM 380 leak detectors. PN: SNC1E1T1
Out of Stock
Expecting: 11
Arrival: 6 on 2021-12-17


Pfeiffer Adixen Standard Helium Sniffer Probe, 5 m Tube, Rigid 9 cm Nozzle, for ASM 182, 310, ASM 340, ASM 380 Helium Leak Detectors. Pfeiffer Adixen Part Number SNC1E1T1 These Pfeiffer Adixen sniffer probes are used with ASM helium leak detection in sniffing mode. Is a universal accessory which can be used with the Pfeiffer Adixen ASM 182, 310, ASM 340 or ASM 380 leak detector. Easy connections to the leak detectors by external coupling. These Pfeiffer Standard Helium sniffer probes have part number SNC1E1T1 and the Pfeiffer Adixen operating instruction manual and product brochure can be downloaded in PDF format below. CONTENTS of the Helium Sniffer Probe: Plastic Tube 5 m Rigid Nozzle Length 9 cm Helium Leak Testing BasicsHelium mass spectrometry, or helium leak testing, is a highly precise means of leak detection. This technology was first developed for the Manhattan Project during World War II to locate extremely small leaks in the gas diffusion process.At the heart of helium leak testing is a complex piece of equipment called a helium mass spectrometer. Quite simply, this machine is used to analyze air samples (which are introduced into the machine via vacuum pumps) and provides a quantitative measurement of the amount of helium present in the sample. In practice, a leak, is identified by a rise in the level of helium being analyzed by the machine.Helium leak testing can identify extremely small leaks. For example, our equipment can detect a leak so small that it would emit just two cubic centimeters of helium (or the amount equal to two sugar cubes) in 320 years. While very few applications require this level of precision, this example serves to highlight the accuracy possible with this process.While helium leak detection may appear to be a simple procedure, the process involves a combination of both art and science. The user must ensure the equipment is functioning properly and the process is highly dependant upon the userís experience. Consider this analogy: while anyone with enough money can buy an airplane, learning how to fly one takes a lot of practice. The same is true with helium leak detectionómake sure your pilot knows how to fly.Why Is Helium Superior?While many gases are used in leak detection, heliumís qualities provide for superior testing. Having an AMU (Atomic Mass Unit) of only 4, helium is the lightest inert gas. Only hydrogen, with an AMU of 2, is lighter than helium. However, due the hydrogenís explosive potential it is rarely used.Additional reasons why helium is a superior tracer gas: Only modestly present in the atmosphere (roughly 5 parts per million) Flows through cracks 2.7x faster than air Nontoxic Nondestructive Nonexplosive Inexpensive User Friendly Due to these attributes, and its high sensitivity, helium leak testing has gained broad acceptance in a wide range of leak testing applications. Helium Leak Testingís two primary testing modes while there are a variety of testing procedures, in general there are:Two primary methods of helium leak testing: Spray Probe Sniffer Probe The choice between these two modes is based on both the size of the system being tested, as well as, the level of sensitivity required.Spray Probe: Provides Maximum SensitivityFor this technique, the leak detector is hooked directly to the system under test and the inside of the system is evacuated. Once an acceptable vacuum is achieved, helium is sprayed discreetly on the outside of the system, with particular attention being paid to any suspect locations. Any leaks in the system, including defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect will allow helium to pass and be readily detected by the machine. The source of any leaks can then be accurately pinpointed and repaired.The spray probe process is used to achieve the highest level of sensitivity. The equipment being used dictates the maximum sensitivity achievable; in Jurva Leak Testingís case it is 2x10-10 std cc/sec. This technique does require that the system being tested is relatively leak tight prior to testing, as an ample vacuum is required for testing. However, by using special throttling devices a gross test can typically be performed. The gross test should eliminate any major leaks, permitting the use of increased sensitivity.The following are examples of systems that we test using the spray probe technique: A-bar furnaces E-beam systems Laser systems Metal deposition equipment Distillation systems Vacuum systems Sniffer ProbeFor this technique, helium is purged throughout the inside of system being tested. Due to the innate properties of helium it readily migrates throughout the system and in its attempt to escape penetrates any imperfections, including: defective welds (caused by cracks, pin holes, incomplete welds, porosity, etc.), flawed or missing gaskets, leaks due to loose clamps, or any other defect. The systemís exterior is then scanned by using a probe attached to the leak tester. Any leaks will result in an increased level of helium nearest the source and be readily detected. Leak sources can then be pinpointed, providing the opportunity for immediate repair and retest.Unlike the spray probe technique, this process is very flexible and can be adapted to meet the needs of any virtually any system in which helium can be injected. There is no practical size limitation. The sniffer probe technique is not as sensitive as the spray probe process, however, due to the amount of helium present in the air (approximately 5 ppm). The maximum sensitivity achievable under this procedure is approximately 1x10-6 std cc/sec. Nevertheless, this process is vastly superior to other traditional leak testing methods, such as: bubble testing, acoustic emission, liquid penetrant or vacuum box testing.The following list is an example of systems that Jurva Leak Testing has tested using the sniffer probe process: Storage tanks (both above ground and below) Floating roofs Underground pipelines Underground cables Aseptic systems (flash coolers, heat exchangers, fillers, etc.) Any vessel/line or system that can be pressurized

Condition: New



Product Number: P105946



Price: $808.05



Pfeiffer Adixen Inlet port filter for ASM-340 Helium Leak Detector PN 103395
In Stock: 1


Pfeiffer Adixen Inlet port filter for ASM-340 Helium Leak Detector Pfeiffer Adixen Part Number 103395This is a medium-mesh inlet port filter for the ASM-340 Helium Leak Detector designed to keep the detector from ingesting medium size particles.

Condition: New



Product Number: P108817



Price: $244.52



Pfeiffer Adixen Inlet metal filter screen KF40 DN40KF 70 microns for ASM-340 Helium Leak Detector
In Stock: 1


Pfeiffer Adixen Inlet metal filter screen KF40 DN40KF 70 microns for ASM-340 Leak Detector Pfeiffer Adixen Part Number 067636This is a 70 micron mesh screen inlet filter for the ASM-340 Helium Leak Detector. Size KF40 DN40KF.

Condition: New



Product Number: P108816



Price: $138.23



Pfeiffer Adixen Inlet metal filter screen KF25 DN25KF 70 microns for ASM-340 Helium Leak Detector PN 072857
In Stock: 1


Pfeiffer Adixen Inlet metal filter screen KF25 DN25KF 70 microns for ASM-340 Leak Detector Pfeiffer Adixen Part Number 072857This is a mesh screen inlet 70 micron filter for the ASM-340 Helium Leak Detector. Size KF25 DN25KF.

Condition: New



Product Number: P108815



Price: $150.12



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CONTACT US
Ideal Vacuum Products, LLC
5910 Midway Park Blvd NE,
Albuquerque, NM 87109-5805

Phone: (505) 872-0037
Fax: (505) 872-9001
info@idealvac.com